Naka016 leaving his shelter

May we introduce some unique footage of NAKA016 captured just days ago here at Sakaerat SERS. Enjoy (Bartosz Nadol certainly enjoyed this visual) 🙂

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Yellow-striped Rat Snake Coelognathus flavolineatus

Hello,

Last week we opened a new passive trap in a stream bed within the Dry Evergreen Forest of Sakaerat SERS. After just one night of trap closure, a rarely seen Yellow-striped Rat Snake Coelognathus flavolineatus was found during early morning checks. It was the second individual encountered here over 3 years making it a great find.

This species grows up to 1.8m in length and is terrestrial (with good climbing skills). A constrictor that preys on small mammals, eggs and frogs, it is crepuscular (active at dusk)/nocturnal and oviparous with clutch sizes from 5 to 12 eggs. NON VENOMOUS.

The picture below is juvenile of this species.

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And the sub-adult female recently captured in the trap.

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Spotted Saturday

Our work focuses on the spatial ecology of the Monocled and Indochinese Spitting Cobra. Our field assistants track the snakes and gather data on the micro-habitats that are utilized. As such, on rare occasions, we will have a visual and witness the snakes (and their behaviour) in their natural environment. We aim to disturb the snakes as little as possible and great care is taken during data gathering to achieve this.
Just yesterday, our tracker Lichy Pulman was locating our longest tracked Monocled Cobra: NAKA012. Through use of radiotelemetry, the snake appeared to be stationery within the Dry Dipterocarp Forest. Once carefully and slowly located, the snake was found basking on an outcrop of stone within the forest. Once spotted, our tracker monitored from 10 meters until the snake started to move in his direction. Movement was therefore necessary resulting in the snake sensing human presence. Although not visibly panicked, NAKA012 turned slowly and repositioned 20m away.
The video was captured on a mobile phone, therefore the quality is not great, but the content is superb.

In with the new, out with the old!

Hello all from the currently blue skied Sakaerat biosphere! We’ve been as busy as ever, mostly due to a high frequency of movements from every one of the Cobras we are tracking.  Also, due to three of our radiotelemetry receivers being in repair, keeping up with our snakes has proved challenging but we are rising to the task and gathering some great data as well as getting plenty of camera trap photos that will be posted online soon.

 

New to the team!

This month the Sakerat Najas team welcomed two new volunteers: Richy Pulman and Joseph Surivong.  Richy is due to stay for at least six months, and Joseph will return to university in September, with a view to returning to the Najas project – possibly to carry out research to aid in his dissertation for Msc.

 

In with the new, out with the old!

Although the Najas project would love to keep hard working and highly skilled trackers forever, we are aware that sometimes things come to an end. We have said goodbye (in style – with adventures, picnics & bbq’s) to two volunteers this month: Lydia Snow and Sam Smith. Both of these close friends had a great time here at SERS, learning lots, forming close friendships and working downright hard. Their tracking abilities are already missed, as is their presence.

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Sam has returned to the USA (after a spot of travelling in Thailand) to continue with her studies and Lydia will be returning to England in search of more conservation work worldwide (but only after a well earned month off travelling around Cambodia).

From Bart and the Sakaerat Najas Project: thank you both so very much for the effort you’ve put in here during your stay. Your professional approach and integrity will surely land you in some great positions in the future. All the best, and good luck!

From everyone at SERS: We miss you and hope to see you both soon!

Nasi014 capture

On 4th of July we had rescue call. People called us saying that the have King Cobra at their house. At the site it turned out that snake is actually Indochinese Spitting Cobra. Nasi014 is 1.3 m and 432 g  male. After implantation with radio transmitter this snake is part of our project. Interesting is that this snake share at least part of its home range with Opha019 (2.7 m King Cobra) radio tracked by Sakaerat Conservation and Snake Education Team.

First picture made by Cameron Hodges show snake as found in the house.

We wish this snake good luck. There is at least on hungry King Cobra around…

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Naka014 capture

On 29th May 2016 Monocled Cobra Naja kaouthia Nakao14 was noticed by Tyler who went jogging to the forest. Snake was crossing main road. Tyler, as he did not carry any handling tools, followed snake to very old termite mound. Once snake sheltered he blocked entrance with the stone and run like Forest Gump for back up. We dig the snake out and now Naka014 is part of  our radio telemetry project. This snake is only female of Monocled Cobra that we currently radio track and second in history of our project. She is 1.56 m long and 870 g body weight.  Unfortunately snake wasn’t a good model and she book it straight after release.