Malayan Krait

During last Sakaerat Najas Project late night survey we found Malayan Krait (Bungarus candidus). It is very venomous species active at night. This male was 1.3 m. Very yellow on ventral side of the body. Characteristic of this species are triangular body shape and bands that are equal size along all body (mimic species present in Thailand). In some part of the range snakes might be uniformly black. Venom of this species is potent. It has strong effect on nervous system. Tourniquet is needed in case of envenomation. Patient must be transported to the closest hospital. Always is best to leave all snakes alone or call for your local rescue crew. Remember killing them is dangerous.

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Black & Yellow

Hello.

One of the venomous species found around Sakaerat SERS station is Banded Krait (Bungarus fasciatus). This Is large species of the family Elapidae that can grow to over 2 m. This snakes are nocturnal animals. They feed mainly on other serpents. It is not easy to find them here.

 

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Our colleague Tyler Knierim is conducting his master research on this species. Recently at lest one of his females was nesting and I was lucky enough to photograph two neonates in my studio. As you can see from the picture coloration of the neonates is more pale than adults individuals. They will gain more yellow colour with each shedding.

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Kraits have a very interesting form of the defensive behavior. The hide their heads under the body coils while exposing their blunt ended tail. Once they will feel threaten they will strike energetically to the side.

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Hope you enjoy the photos.

Green Pit Vipers from Thailand

Hello,

We would like to present you with one of the effects of our last Visit at Queen Saovabha Memorial Institute. We were lucky to photograph some of snakes kept in the institute.

This time we present you with several beautiful green pit vipers species.

Green Pit Vipers are responsible for biggest amount of envenomations in Thailand (about 40%). Their venom varies in toxicity between species, but all are primarily hemotoxic and considered to be medically significant to humans.

Bites can be avoided by using a light while walking in the dark and double check on dark places like log/rubbish piles before putting hands in.

 

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